Information for international and interprovincial travellers

  

 

Important Notices

 

  • Travel Registration Program
    If you are travelling into – or back to – New Brunswick, you can register beforehand to speed up your trip. Apply online through the Travel Registration Program. Find out more at www.gnb.ca/TravelRegistration.  
     
  • Notice on travel into New Brunswick (poster) (July 20)

      
  • Compassionate travel
    Residents of the Atlantic provinces are not required to obtain authorization.

    This includes in-home end of life visitation; end of life visitation in a hospital, nursing home or hospice (with written confirmation from the facility that you will be allowed entry); to provide care for a person in need of in-home support; to receive in-home care; or to provide or receive child care services that are not available by other means. 

    You can start the application process by calling the Canadian Red Cross at 1-800-863-6582 and selecting your language of choice. Once in the menu, select “ 1 – Impacted by a Disaster “ then “5 – New Brunswick” and then “1 – Affected by COVID-19”.

    We cannot grant compassionate requests to cross into New Brunswick from another country on compassionate grounds. The Government of Canada regulates the international border and travellers entering Canada.

 

  • Funerals/Celebrations of life
    The Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health has issued general guidance for interprovincial travellers, including specific information on funerals and burials. Details are available here

    Entry is permitted to attend the funeral or burial of a family member defined below.

    Entry is not permitted for:

1. Making funeral arrangements
2. Visiting
3. Attending the wake

Who can enter to attend a funeral?

1. Parent (including step-parents and parents-in-law)
2. Child (including step-children, foster children and adoptive children)
3. Grandparent (including great-grandparents)
4. Grandchild (including great-grandchildren)
5. Sibling (including step-siblings, half-siblings)
6. Significant other (defined as one of two persons in an intimate partner relationship) 

 

  • Travellers looking for more information can call 1-844-462-8387 on Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 


 

Twinned communities in Quebec

(Avignon Municipal Regional County and Listuguj First)

*** Please note that effective Sept. 17, 2020 twinning with Temiscouata Municipal Regional County has been suspended. Residents of Temiscouata MRC can still cross the border for essential reasons such as medical appointments, approved work, shared child custody, as they have been throughout the pandemic. All previously approved registrations to and from Temiscouata for non-essential single trips and multi-day registrations are no longer valid.***

Residents of the Avignon Municipal Regional County and Listuguj First Nation who travel into New Brunswick as part of same-day travel only with no overnight stays will not need to self-isolate when they enter New Brunswick.

Residents of the Atlantic provinces (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador) who travel into, but not beyond, Avignon Municipal Regional County and Listuguj First Nation as part of same day travel with no overnight stays will not need to self-isolate when they return to New Brunswick.

Persons entering from those regions will be required to

  • pre-register through www.gnb.ca/TravelRegistration;
  • • prove residency in an Atlantic Province, Avignon Municipal Regional County or Listuguj First Nation;
  • attest that they are free of COVID-19 symptoms;
  • attest they have not travelled outside their communities, except into an Atlantic Province, in the previous 14 days;
  • select Quebec twinning as reason for travel.

To ensure the health and safety of all Atlantic Canadians, it is important to maintain good public health measures such as:

  • Avoid travel / vacationing and staying home if sick
  • maintain physical distancing (2m / 6ft)
  • wear a community face mask when physical distancing not possible to maintain
  • limit contact with people at higher risk, such as older adults and those in poor health
  • clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces often
  • Frequently wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after using the washroom and when preparing food
    • use alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available
  • when coughing or sneezing:
    • cough or sneeze into a tissue or the bend of your arm, not your hand
    • dispose of any tissues you have used as soon as possible in a lined waste basket and wash your hands afterwards
    • avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands

Cottage/camp owners crossing to or from Témiscouata MRC, Quebec

If you need to travel to or from the Témiscouata region to close up and/or retrieve belongings from a camp or cottage, you may do so from Wednesday September 23rd until Wednesday September 30th only. If you are travelling for these purposes, you will be able to enter or return to New Brunswick without a requirement to self-isolate, as long as your trip is no more than 24 hours.

Anyone travelling for these purposes may do so for one time only and is required to register their travel through www.gnb.ca/travelregistration. When registering, select “Other” under “Reason for Entry” and explain where you are travelling. If your registration is approved, when entering New Brunswick, ensure you have all required documentation, including your travel registration and proof of ownership or rental of the camp or cottage. You are expected to go directly to and from the location, not make any stops and not visit businesses or interact with anyone not part of your immediate family or bubble while in the province where your camp/cottage is located. When returning to New Brunswick and vice versa, do not make any unnecessary stops.
 

Multi-use registration for visitors from border areas of Quebec and Nova Scotia

  • If you live in Listuguj First Nation or Avignon MRC in Quebec, or Cumberland County, Nova Scotia, and you travel to New Brunswick regularly to attend school or for non-essential visits (shopping, visiting friends and family, recreational activities), you may apply for a multiple-use registration. Select “multi-use” when you register and enter the date range of up to 60 days for your multiple-use registration. 
      
  • You will continue to be screened at points of entry. Residents of Listuguj First Nation and Avignon MRC continue to be limited to day travel with no overnight stays.

  


 

Travelling outside of Atlantic Canada

Avoid all non-essential travel outside of Atlantic Canada. 

If you must travel, please visit the Government of Canada's travel advice and advisories page for your destination(s) regularly to verify travel health recommendations and safety and security information.

The destination(s) you are travelling to may have different rules and public health measures in place to protect residents from COVID-19. Do your research before leaving so you are not caught unaware when you arrive.

It’s important to remember that if you leave the province, not only are you subject to rules in place at your destination(s), but the rules in New Brunswick upon your return as well. For example, unless you’re exempt, you must self-isolate for 14 days after you get back to the province.

  


 

Atlantic Bubble Travel 


Effective Friday, July 3, residents of the Atlantic provinces (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador) can travel within the four provinces without the requirement to self-isolate. Atlantic Canadians travelling within the region will not need to self-isolate for 14 days.

To ensure the health and safety of all Atlantic Canadians, it is important to maintain good public health measures such as:

  • Avoid travel / vacationing and staying home if sick
  • maintain physical distancing (2m / 6ft)
  • wear a community face mask when physical distancing not possible to maintain
  • limit contact with people at higher risk, such as older adults and those in poor health
  • clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces often
  •  Frequently wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after using the washroom and when preparing food
    • use alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available
  • when coughing or sneezing:
    • cough or sneeze into a tissue or the bend of your arm, not your hand
    • dispose of any tissues you have used as soon as possible in a lined waste basket and wash your hands afterwards
    • avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands

 

Screening of travellers entering New Brunswick

All travellers, including those entering from the other Atlantic provinces, will continue to be screened at interprovincial points of entry into New Brunswick and will be asked for proof of province of residence. Providing this information will support Public Health’s tracing efforts in the event of a case or an outbreak of COVID-19. If you are planning to enter the province, please come prepared with the required documents for travel into New Brunswick.

Register your travel ahead of entering New Brunswick as part of your travel preparation plans. Find out more at www.gnb.ca/TravelRegistration.


Acceptable proof of Atlantic residency
:  (one of the following)

  • Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, or Prince Edward Island driver’s licence
  • Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, or Prince Edward Island government identification card
  • Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, or Prince Edward Island employee identification card
  • Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, or Prince Edward Island Medicare card
  • Other:
    • Utility Bill – phone, internet, electricity, cable, water/sewer or a home heating fuel invoice (oil, natural gas, propane, etc.).
    • Bank Statement, cancelled or void cheque with address
    • Mortgage Documents
    • Personal Income Taxes
    • Property Tax Bill
    • Residential Lease (must be completed and signed by landlord & tenant)
    • Social Assistance Benefit Confirmation including Employment Insurance
    • Employment confirmation or pay stub
    • Child Tax Credit Cheque/stub
    • Declaration from a Guarantor form

 

Returning from travel outside of New Brunswick

Unless you are exempt, New Brunswickers returning from travel outside of Atlantic Canada need to self-isolate for 14 days. (New Brunswickers returning from work in another Canadian province or territory continue to not be required to self-isolate when they return to New Brunswick).


International travellers

The Government of Canada regulates the international border and travellers entering Canada.

Anyone granted entry into Canada is permitted to enter New Brunswick provided that New Brunswick is their immediate destination (where they plan to isolate) or part of the direct route to their immediate destination.

Anyone who enters Canada but does not travel directly to New Brunswick (e.g. they undertake their isolation period in another province or territory), will only be permitted entry into New Brunswick if they qualify under the admission criteria. International travellers approved by the Canadian Border Services Agency are not required to complete a provincial traveller registration provided that they are starting their self-isolation in New Brunswick.

You will be required to self-isolate for 14 days under the federal Quarantine Act  unless exempt, and upon entering New Brunswick, must follow the guidance of the Chief Medical Officer of Health.

For entry into Canada and Canada-U.S. border restrictions, visit the Government of Canada page here and the Canada Border Services Agency page here or call 1-800-461-9999.

 

Student travellers

International Students

Students coming to New Brunswick from outside Canada must follow any directives from the Government of Canada including orders under the federal Quarantine Act and, upon entering New Brunswick, follow the guidance of the Chief Medical Officer of Health. Students coming to New Brunswick from outside Canada who must make a connection or layover in another province may undertake their federal self-isolation once in New Brunswick. International students spending time in another province for any other reason must complete their 14 days of isolation in that province before entering New Brunswick and will be directed to self-isolate for a further 14 days if arriving from any province outside of Atlantic Canada. International students are not required to fill out a Travel Registration to enter the province for studies.

Travellers arriving from the United States – For entry into Canada and Canada-U.S. border restrictions, visit the Government of Canada page here and the Canada Border Services Agency page here or call 1-800-461-9999.

Travellers arriving from a country other than the United States – You must enter through the Canada Border Services Agency. Click here for more information or call 1-800-461-9999.

 

Canadian students moving to New Brunswick

Students moving to New Brunswick from Canadian provinces or territories outside of Atlantic Canada must follow the guidance of the Chief Medical Officer of Health, including self-isolating for 14 days. These students should select “Moving to NB (Non-NB Resident)” as their Reason for Entry when registering their travel at www.gnb.ca/TravelRegistration

 

Canadian family accompanying students moving into New Brunswick

Family members from Canadian provinces or territories outside of Atlantic Canada who are accompanying students moving to New Brunswick may enter New Brunswick for a period of not more than 24 hours and they are expected to self-isolate while in the province. These travellers should select “Other” as their Reason for Entry when registering their travel at www.gnb.ca/TravelRegistration and indicate in the Detailed Reasons for Entry that they are “Accompanying a student to New Brunswick.”

 

New Brunswickers accompanying students moving outside of New Brunswick

Anyone returning to New Brunswick after accompanying students who have moved outside of the Atlantic Provinces must follow the guidance of the Chief Medical Officer of Health, including self-isolating for 14 days.

Entry into Canada falls under federal jurisdiction and any inquiries should be made to the Government of Canada. Anyone coming to New Brunswick from outside Canada must follow any directives from the Government of Canada including orders under the federal Quarantine Act and, upon entering New Brunswick, follow the guidance of the Chief Medical Officer of Health, including self-isolating for 14 days.

These travellers should select “Other” as their Reason for Entry when registering their travel at www.gnb.ca/TravelRegistration and indicate in the Detailed Reasons for Entry that they are “Accompanying a student moving out of New Brunswick.”


Visitors and property owners from outside Atlantic Canada

Canadian residents owning property in New Brunswick can enter the province provided they self-isolate for 14 days, or the duration of the visit if shorter than 14 days.

Canadian residents can visit family members in New Brunswick provided they self-isolate for 14 days, or the duration of the visit if shorter than 14 days.

Once visitors from other Canadian provinces and territories finish their 14-day self-isolation they may travel within the Maritime provinces.

The people considered a family member who can enter the province are:

  • Parent (including step-parents and parents-in-law)
  • Child (including step-children, foster children and adoptive children
  • Grandparent (including great-grandparents)
  • Grandchild (including great-grandchildren)
  • Sibling (including step-siblings, half-siblings)
  • Significant other (defined as one of two persons in an intimate partner relationship)
  • Foster families

 


 

Travelling into New Brunswick

Everyone entering New Brunswick at any point of entry, including airports, must stop when instructed to do so by a peace officer and answer any questions as required to support the intent of the requirements of the Chief Medical Officer of Health. Where a person is not met by a peace officer at their point of entry, they must report to a peace officer and answer questions upon being directed to do so.

If you are planning to enter the province, please come prepared with the required documents for travel into New Brunswick.

Register your travel ahead of entering New Brunswick as part of your travel preparation plans. Find out more at www.gnb.ca/TravelRegistration.

 


 

COVID-19 and border management

In every case, entry is conditional on each individual providing identity documents, including contact phone number, agree that they have been provided written information documenting the requirements of the Chief Medical Officer of Health, and acknowledging that failure to comply with isolation and follow-up compliance checks by enforcement officials may result in consequences.

   

Returning residents

New Brunswick residents returning from away are permitted to enter New Brunswick by land, sea, or air after screening. If you have travelled within the Atlantic Bubble they are not required to self-isolate. If they travelled outside the Atlantic provinces they are required to follow the advice of the Chief Medical Officer of Health, including self-isolation within New Brunswick for 14 days unless otherwise exempt.  


Relocating to NB permanently

People entering to relocate to New Brunswick permanently must follow the latest guidance of the Chief Medical Officer of Health including self-isolation if required.  


People not required to self-isolate

In addition to the Atlantic Bubble, where New Brunswickers and Atlantic visitors are not required to self-isolate during their return or visit; the following persons are permitted to enter New Brunswick and are not required to self-isolate:

1)  Those who demonstrate they are travelling through to another jurisdiction and who agree to limit stops to food, fuel and personal needs and agree to follow the guidance of the Chief Medical Officer of Health

2)  Workers who are healthy and:

a)  provide or support things essential to the health, safety, security or economic well-being of New Brunswickers, including;

i)   Commercial transportation of goods by truck, train and plane

ii)  Maintenance of critical infrastructure telecommunications, transportation, data, fuel, electricity, manufacturing, water and wastewater, health and financial systems that is urgent and unplanned and where New Brunswick services are not available

b)  live in or near an interprovincial border community and commute to and from work locally, where the person lives in one province and works or operates a business in another.

c)  New Brunswick residents no longer need to self-isolate when returning from work in another Canadian province or territory.

3)  Individuals who:

a)  are healthy residents of Campobello Island who must cross the border to access required goods and services

b)  are patients who must travel to access healthcare services in another province because the service is unavailable within NB

c)  are patients from another province who must continue to access medical care in New Brunswick

d)  are a family unit of parents and children, to facilitate shared custody of children as per a court order or formal custody agreement

All such workers and individuals who are exempt from self-isolation must travel directly to and from work and/or their accommodations, self-monitor and avoid contact with vulnerable individuals, and follow the guidance of the Chief Medical Officer of Health.
  

Businesses, work and workplaces

People entering New Brunswick from outside Atlantic Canada for work for a fixed period

Unless the worker is a person entering New Brunswick under an arrangement with an employer previously approved by WorkSafe NB, persons entering for a specific period of work from another jurisdiction outside of Atlantic Canada, with proof of their employment may enter, but must also follow the advice of the Chief Medical Officer of Health, including self-isolation within New Brunswick for 14 days prior to commencing work.   
   

Businesses and employers

Any business or employer must either:

1)  ensure that any workers contracted or employed who must travel from outside New Brunswick self-isolate within New Brunswick for 14 days, not leave their isolation site, and follow the guidance of the Chief Medical Officer of Health and WorkSafeNB before and after entering any workplace. 

OR

2)  submit to WorkSafeNB a minimum of 15 business days in advance of expected employee arrival in the province and receive prior approval from WorkSafe NB of the isolation elements of an Operational Plan for inter-provincial workers outside of the Atlantic provinces. The plan must address that the employer will ensure that workers from outside the Atlantic provinces are, for 14 days after they enter the New Brunswick:

i.  isolated from any New Brunswicker while they travel to and from their accommodations and worksite

ii.  required to remain at their accommodations and isolated from contact with any New Brunswicker during work hours and while off duty

iii.  effectively supervised to ensure these isolation measures are met

iv.  compliant with any requirements set out by the Chief Medical Officer of Health or WorkSafeNB

For purposes of clarity, any workers contracted or employed by an employer and who live in or near an interprovincial border community and commute to work daily, are not require to self-isolate as outlined above. Alternatively, any worker contracted or employed by an employer and who live in or near an interprovincial border community, but are unable to commute and return home daily, is subject to the self-isolation requirements as outlined above.

Any person who arrives from outside Canada is subject to the federal Quarantine Act and the provisions of that Act apply. Information regarding Canadians remaining in New Brunswick is shared with public health and public safety officials to monitor and ensure compliance.

     


Frequently asked questions

 

Unnecessary travel into New Brunswick is limited, and peace officers are authorized to turn visitors away when they attempt to enter. Unnecessary travel includes non-residents entering New Brunswick to make or receive purchases or to visit or for other social purposes.

It is recognized that some travel is necessary, including: residents of other provinces who must enter New Brunswick to work or to receive medical treatment, commercial vehicle drivers delivering goods, residents of Campobello Island entering to access essential goods or services. Necessary travel also includes travel required to facilitate children sharing their time between parents. New Brunswick residents who have been out of province temporarily continue to be permitted to return home.

At the entry point at Campbellton, non-residents are also permitted entry to obtain groceries or prescription medications not available to them in their own community and necessities of life.

All travellers are asked to explain the purpose of their travels, if travel is deemed essential in nature, those residents are permitted to enter New Brunswick for that purpose only and are expected to return to the province of Quebec immediately upon completing that essential task.

Under the emergency order, Peace Officers are empowered to turn travelers away. Peace Officers are also empowered to return travelers to a point of entry.

With few exceptions, anyone who comes to New Brunswick from outside the province and remains here is required to self-isolate for 14 days and conduct themselves in accordance with the requirements of the Chief Medical Officer of Health. There are some exceptions, like those exempted under an order of the Chief Medical Officer of Health or under a section of the Mandatory Order.

Information on self-isolation, including how to self-isolate if there are others in the home, is available here.  

Certain persons are permitted to enter New Brunswick and are not required to self-isolate:

1)  Those who demonstrate they are travelling through to another jurisdiction and who agree to limit stops to food, fuel and personal needs and agree to follow the guidance of the Chief Medical Officer of Health

2)  Workers who are healthy and:

a)  provide or support things essential to the health, safety, security or economic well-being of New Brunswickers, including;

i)  Commercial transportation of goods by truck, train and plane

ii)  Maintenance of critical infrastructure telecommunications, transportation, data, fuel, electricity, manufacturing, water and wastewater, health and financial systems that is urgent and unplanned and where New Brunswick services are not available

b)  live in or near an interprovincial border community and commute to and from work locally, where the person lives in one province and works or operates a business in another.

c) New Brunswick residents no longer need to self-isolate when returning from work in another Canadian province or territory.

3)  Individuals who:

a)  are healthy residents of Campobello Island who must cross the border to access required goods and services

b)  are patients who must travel to access healthcare services in another province because the service is unavailable within NB.

c) are patients from another province who must continue to access medical care in New Brunswick

d)  are a family unit of parents and children, to facilitate shared custody of children as per a court order or formal custody agreement

All such workers and individuals who are exempt from self-isolation must travel directly to and from work and/or their accommodations, self-monitor and avoid contact with vulnerable individuals, and follow the guidance of the Chief Medical Officer of Health.

Unless the worker is a person entering New Brunswick under an arrangement with an employer previously approved by WorkSafe NB, persons entering for a specific period of work from another jurisdiction, with proof of their employment may enter, but must also follow the advice of the Chief Medical Officer of Health, including self-isolation within New Brunswick for 14 days prior to commencing work.  

Any business or employer must either:

1)  ensure that any workers contracted or employed who must travel from outside New Brunswick self-isolate within New Brunswick for 14 days, not leave their isolation site, and follow the guidance of the Chief Medical Officer of Health and WorkSafeNB before and after entering any workplace. 

OR

2)  submit to WorkSafeNB a minimum of 15 business days in advance of expected employee arrival in the province and receive prior approval from WorkSafe NB of the isolation elements of an Operational Plan for inter-provincial workers outside of the Atlantic provinces. The plan must address that the employer will ensure that workers from outside the Atlantic provinces are, for 14 days after they enter the New Brunswick:

i.  isolated from any New Brunswicker while they travel to and from their accommodations and worksite

ii.  required to remain at their accommodations and isolated from contact with any New Brunswicker during work hours and while off duty

iii.  effectively supervised to ensure these isolation measures are met

iv.  compliant with any requirements set out by the Chief Medical Officer of Health or WorkSafeNB

For purposes of clarity, any workers contracted or employed by an employer and who live in or near an interprovincial border community and commute to work daily, are not require to self-isolate as outlined above. Alternatively, any worker contracted or employed by an employer and who live in or near an interprovincial border community, but are unable to commute and return home daily, is subject to the self-isolation requirements as outlined above.

Any person who arrives from outside Canada is subject to the federal Quarantine Act and the provisions of that Act apply.

Workers who are healthy and who commute locally to and from work, where the person lives close to the border in one province and works at or operates a business in another are permitted to enter.

All such workers and individuals who are exempt from self-isolation must travel directly to and from work and/or their accommodations, self-monitor and avoid contact with vulnerable individuals, and follow the guidance of the Chief Medical Officer of Health.

Like all travelers entering New Brunswick, those driving through will be screened upon entry and asked to answer questions required to support the intent of the requirements of the Chief Medical Officer of Health. Travelers who pass screening at a point of entry and can demonstrate that they are authorized to travel through to their province of destination can travel through New Brunswick to go directly to their destination. Peace officers are authorized to deny entry into New Brunswick.

Entry into Canada falls under federal jurisdiction and any inquiries should be made to the Government of Canada. Please note that the Canada Border Services Agency has instituted a COVID-19 hotline regarding border crossing concerns/questions at 1-800-461-9999.

Additional information related to travel can be found here. As the situation is currently evolving, please visit www.gnb.ca/coronavirus regularly for the most up-to-date and accurate information on COVID-19.

While screening is being done by airlines at the point of departure, New Brunswick enforcement officers are meeting scheduled, chartered and private flights arriving in the province. In the same way as their colleagues posted at the overland points of entry, they are screening arriving travelers to ensure compliance with the mandatory order.  

The Mandatory Order COVID-19 prohibits all unnecessary travel which includes non-residents of New Brunswick entering the province to visit or for other social purposes. The Order does not prohibit taking up residence in New Brunswick.

Persons entering the province will be asked to stop at the border and answer questions as required. If you intend to take up residence in the province, you may be asked to show proof of future residence, such as a signed lease, a purchase and sale agreement or communications from a landlord. 

Every person who will be remaining in the province must then self-isolate for 14 days and conduct themselves in accordance with the requirements of the Chief Medical Officer of Health

For more resources to help keep your community safe, please visit www.gnb.ca/coronavirus.

Individuals may enter New Brunswick to clean out a post-secondary student’s apartment for a period of not more than 24 hours and they are expected to self-isolate while in the province. Staying longer than 24 hours is considered remaining in the province and the 14-day self isolation period would apply. Keep in mind that further restrictions could be applied upon return to their home province.  

If a person leaves New Brunswick for any length of time to clean out a post-secondary student’s apartment in another province, they will be ordered, upon their return to New Brunswick, to self-isolate for 14 days and follow the requirements of the Chief Medical Officer of Health

Any person moving to New Brunswick is required to self-isolate for 14 days, regardless to whether they were commuters to the province immediately preceding their move to the province.  

Paragraphs from the Mandatory Order COVID-19 relating to entering New Brunswick:  

  • Every person entering New Brunswick at any point of entry shall stop when instructed to do so by a peace officer and answer any such questions as required to support the intent of the requirements of the Chief Medical Officer of Health.   Every such person who will be remaining in the province must then self-isolate for 14 days and conduct themselves in accordance with the requirements of the Chief Medical Officer of Health.
        
  • All unnecessary travel into New Brunswick is prohibited, and peace officers are hereby authorized to turn visitors away when they attempt to enter. It is recognized that some travel is necessary, including: residents of other provinces who must enter New Brunswick to work or to receive medical treatment, commercial vehicle drivers delivering goods, residents of Campobello Island entering to access essential goods or services. Necessary travel also includes travel required to facilitate children sharing their time between parents. New Brunswick residents who have been out of province temporarily continue to be permitted to return home. Unnecessary travel includes non-residents of New Brunswick entering New Brunswick to make or receive purchases or to visit or for other social purposes. At the entry point at Campbellton, non-residents will be permitted entry to obtain necessities of life.

 Visit www.gnb.ca/coronavirus regularly for the most up-to-date and accurate information on COVID-19. 

To lower the risk to New Brunswickers, we will be opening the province in stages. The restrictions at borders to other provinces and states are not being lifted at this time.

As of June 19:

People living in other parts of Canada who are symptom-free are now allowed to visit their family members in New Brunswick, but those visitors must self-isolate for the first 14 days of each visit.

People living in other parts of Canada who are symptom-free and who own property in New Brunswick can now visit to stay there, but they must self-isolate for the first 14 days of each visit.

New Brunswickers must continue to respect physical distancing measures for all those outside their household or “bubble”. It is not recommended that New Brunswickers share indoor living spaces with those who are outside their household unit. 

While we would not recommend inviting new contacts into your home; we encourage New Brunswickers to group outside or refer to virtual options.

The Chief Medical Officer of Health or her designate may authorize travel into New Brunswick, to provide care for a palliative patient or for similar exceptional humanitarian or compassionate purposes, with or without an exemption from the requirement of self-isolation. This includes in-home end of life visitation; end of life visitation in a hospital, nursing home or hospice (with written confirmation from the facility that you will be allowed entry); to provide care for a person in need of in-home support; to receive in-home care; or to provide or receive child care services that are not available by other means. 

You can start the application process by calling the Canadian Red Cross at 1-800-863-6582 and selecting your language of choice. Once in the menu, select “ 1 – Impacted by a Disaster “ then “5 – New Brunswick” and then “1 – Affected by COVID-19”.

No. Travel into New Brunswick for these reasons is prohibited at this time. A definition of necessary travel is listed in the mandatory order.

The Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health has issued general guidance for interprovincial travellers, including specific information on funerals and burials. Details are available here

Entry is permitted to attend the funeral or burial of a family member defined below.

Entry is not permitted for:

1. Making funeral arrangements
2. Visiting
3. Attending the wake

Who can enter to attend a funeral?

1. Parent (including step-parents and parents-in-law)
2. Child (including step-children, foster children and adoptive children)
3. Grandparent (including great-grandparents)
4. Grandchild (including great-grandchildren)
5. Sibling (including step-siblings, half-siblings)
6. Significant other (defined as one of two persons in an intimate partner relationship) 

  • Parent (including step-parents and parents-in-law)
  • Child (including step-children, foster children and adoptive children)
  • Grandparent (including great-grandparents)
  • Grandchild (including great-grandchildren)
  • Sibling (including step-siblings, half-siblings)
  • Significant other (defined as one of two persons in an intimate partner relationship)
  • Foster families

Acceptable proof of family relationships (one of the following):

  • Birth certificate naming parents/children
  • Adoption papers naming parents/children
  • Foster family court order
  • Record of Landing Form/Confirmation of Permanent Residence (IMM 5292) with names of family members
  • Marriage certificate
  • Correspondence from the receiving family confirming the relationship and visit
  • Solemn affirmation from both parties (must be notarized for minors and/or those unable to consent for medical or other reasons)

Significant other is defined as one of two persons in an intimate partner relationship.

 Yes.

Acceptable proof of significant other (one of the following):

  • Copies of government-issued ID with the same address
  • Proof of separation if previously married
  • Proof of joint ownership/ rental agreement of property
  • Proof of joint utility accounts (e.g. electricity, gas, telephone, internet), joint credit card accounts, or joint bank accounts
  • Joint vehicle insurance documents
  • Solemn affirmation from both parties (one or separate letters)

Individuals who entered New Brunswick prior to July 3 from an Atlantic Province and were directed to self-isolate are no longer required to complete their 14-day self-isolation, provided that:

  • They have not travelled outside of the Atlantic provinces within the last 14 days;
  • They do not have any symptoms of COVID-19 infection; and
  • They are not awaiting COVID-19 test results (if so – they should remain in self-isolation until negative test results received).

Travellers should continue to self-monitor and follow other common hygiene practices.

Self-isolation requirements remain in place for travellers coming from other provinces and for travellers under federal orders such as the Quarantine Act.

Visitors from other Canadian provinces and territories must adhere to the local entry requirements in place in each of the four jurisdictions. Once they have self-isolated for 14 days within one of the Atlantic provinces, they may travel within the Maritimes without triggering the requirement to self-isolate. The province of Newfoundland and Labrador is not permitting visitors from outside the bubble at this time. Travelers are required to follow public health guidelines, self-monitor and to self-isolate if they show any symptoms of COVID-19 infection.

Yes, unless exempt. At entry points to the province, travelers will be asked about any travels outside of the Atlantic region within the last 14 days. Anyone who has travelled outside the Atlantic region will be required to self-isolate for 14 days after entering the province.

Not for the purpose of entry into New Brunswick, so long as the duration is an overnight stay or less and all public health guidelines for travellers are followed. Residents of the Atlantic Provinces may, when necessary, travel through an airport outside Atlantic Canada (including changing planes) and spend up to a single night outside of the Atlantic region without triggering the requirement to requirement to self-isolate upon entering the province. Prince Edward Island has indicated that any individuals who arrive from locations outside of Atlantic region, including flight layovers, must self-isolate for 14 days. 

Every jurisdiction has its own requirements.

New Brunswickers should consult the websites of Prince Edward IslandNova Scotia or Newfoundland and Labrador before travelling to these provinces to determine the current regulations, requirements and documentation required.

Anyone returning to New Brunswick after accompanying students who have moved outside of the Atlantic Provinces must follow the guidance of the Chief Medical Officer of Health, including self-isolating for 14 days. These travellers should select “Other” as their Reason for Entry when registering their travel at www.gnb.ca/TravelRegistration and indicate in the Detailed Reasons for Entry that they are “Accompanying a student moving out of New Brunswick.”

Entry into Canada falls under federal jurisdiction and any inquiries should be made to the Government of Canada. Anyone coming to New Brunswick from outside Canada must follow any directives from the Government of Canada including orders under the federal Quarantine Act and, upon entering New Brunswick, follow the guidance of the Chief Medical Officer of Health, including self-isolating for 14 days.

Family members from Canadian provinces or territories outside of Atlantic Canada who are accompanying students moving to New Brunswick may enter New Brunswick for a period of not more than 24 hours and they are expected to self-isolate while in the province. These travellers should select “Other” as their Reason for Entry when registering their travel at www.gnb.ca/TravelRegistration and indicate in the Detailed Reasons for Entry that they are “Accompanying a student to New Brunswick.”